December 7, 2014 Greenwich, CT – WordsworthGreenwich Press has published Henry David Thoreau's accounts of his four walking tours from Eastham to Provincetown, Massachusetts in 1849-1854 in his classic masterpiece, Cape Cod.

In his heyday as pioneers ventured West to settle America, non-conformist Thoreau ventured East. “We went to see the Ocean, and that is probably the best place of all our coast to go to,” he writes.

He views the shore of Cape Cod as a neutral ground and advantageous point for contemplating the world: “There is naked Nature, inhumanly sincere, wasting no thought on man, nibbling at the cliffy shore where gulls wheel amid the spray.”

For Thoreau and transcendentalists like Ralph Waldo Emerson, the way to experience the core of life was intuitive and accessible through mindful immersion in Nature. “I believe there is a subtle magnetism in Nature, which, if we unconsciously yield to it, will direct us aright,” Thoreau writes in his essay, "Walking."

As he walks through Truro, Thoreau takes shelter overnight in Highland Lighthouse shown on the front cover of this edition. “Over this bare Highland the wind has full sweep… You must hold on to the lighthouse to prevent being blown into the Atlantic… If you would feel the full force of a tempest, take up your residence on the top of Mount Washington, or at the Highland Light, in Truro,” he writes.

In 1794 more ships were wrecked on the eastern shore of Truro than anywhere else on The Cape. "Surely the light-house keeper has a responsible, if an easy, office. When his lamp goes out, he goes out.”

Provincetown in Thoreau’s day was located on one of the world’s major shipping lanes. There are the cod and mackerel fleets of 1500 vessels of which 350 could be counted in the harbor at a time. Thoreau paints a pretty picture: “This was the very day one would have chosen to sit upon a hill overlooking sea and land, and muse there. The mackerel fleet was rapidly taking its departure, one schooner after another, and standing round the Cape, like fowls leaving their roosts in the morning to disperse themselves in distant fields.”

On the first morning of his arrival at P’town, “they told me that a vessel had lately come in from the Banks with forty-four thousand codfish. Timothy Dwight says that, just before he arrived at Provincetown, ‘a schooner had come in from the Great Bank with fifty-six thousand fish, almost one thousand five hundred quintals, taken in a single voyage; the main deck being, on her return, eight inches under water in calm weather.’"

The salt cod were so prolific drying in Provincetown that Thoreau first mistook them for cords of wood stacked all over town. He alludes to lobster fishing from small boats for the markets in New York. In Provincetown he witnessed the growth of farming on “Cranberry Meadows” on an extensive scale.

After spending his days sauntering through the length and breadth of Cape Cod, Thoreau leaves Provincetown by ship through Massachusetts Bay for Boston Harbor and 18 miles west to Concord. He seems incapable of rendering a perfect picture of his experiences in his accounting of Cape Cod to do it justice.

“We often love to think now of the life of men on beaches,--at least in midsummer, when the weather is serene; their sunny lives on the sand, amid the beach-grass and the bayberries, their companion a cow, their wealth a jag of driftwood or a few beach-plums, and their music the surf and the peep of the beach-bird.”

When is the best time of year to visit The Cape? Thoreau advised that it's in October. “A storm in the fall or winter is the time to visit it; a light-house or a fisherman's hut the true hotel. A man may stand there and put all America behind him.”

Editor, David B. Lentz, has written a new "Preface to Thoreau's 'Cape Cod'" published inside the book to lend clarity, context and insight into the writing of the New England native from Concord, Massachusetts, who built a small cabin and lived self-reliantly on the shores of Walden Pond for two years in 1845.

More about this WordsworthGreenwich Press edition of Cape Cod from the Classic Masterpiece Series may be previewed at leading booksellers like Amazon at: http://www.amazon.com/Cape-Cod-Classic-Masterpiece-Series/dp/1505321972%3FSubscriptionId%3D0ENGV10E9K9QDNSJ5C82%26tag%3Dflatwave-20%26linkCode%3Dxm2%26camp%3D2025%26creative%3D165953%26creativeASIN%3D1505321972

 A graduate of Bates College, Lentz is a member of the Academy of American Poets, the Poetry Society of America, Connecticut Authors and Publishers Association, the Center for Fiction in New York and the Royal Society of Literature in London. His books are available online, at fine bookstores, libraries and leading Internet booksellers in 29 nations.

 +      +      +

News Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

WordsworthGreenwich Press Launches Classic Masterpiece Series with Thoreau

November 14, 2014 Greenwich, CT Local book publisher, WordsworthGreenwich Press, has begun to launch a new series of books, which are classical genius works by literary masters, starting with Walden and Civil Disobedience by Henry David Thoreau.

Editor, David B. Lentz, has written a new Introduction to Thoreau published to lend clarity, context and insight into the writing of the New England native from Concord, Massachusetts, who built a small cabin and lived self-reliantly on the shores of Walden Pond for two years in 1845.

As a protégé of Ralph Waldo Emerson, Thoreau transformed into a supremely self-reliant individual, which is a core value of the philosophy of transcendentalism founded by them.

Transcendentalists hold that an ideal spiritual state transcends, or overcomes, the physical and empirical world around us and that one achieves insight through personal intuition. Nature is the outward manifestation of one's "over-soul" by expressing the  "radical correspondence of visible things and human thoughts," as Emerson wrote in Nature in 1836.

At Walden Pond, Thoreau finds the engine of this crossing-over into a transcendent understanding of life by his immersive communion with nature in all of its pure manifestations.

"I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived," Thoreau writes in "Walden."

New England poet, Robert Frost, was so enamored of Thoreau's "Walden" that the poet wrote: "In one book... he surpasses everything that we have had in America."

"Thoreau is profound and a close reading of 'Walden' yields in its lucid pages the power to change one's entire perspective for the better through a deeper recognition of the wholeness, harmony, simplicity and radiance of life experienced through a mindful immersion within the beauty that Nature holds as a gift for everyone," said David B. Lentz, Editor. "I was never the same after becoming existentially transformed by my first reading of 'Walden' at college and have re-read it many times since then."

"Civil Disobedience" reflects Thoreau's vision as a pacifist as he failed to see the profit gained by the loss of life, treasure, humanity and time to engage during his time in the Mexican-American War and to enable the institution of slavery to exist in America. His positions on civil disobedience later influenced the philosophy and politics of prominent figures like Leo Tolstoy, Mohandas Gandhi and Martin Luther King, Jr. 

"Civil Disobedience" called for improving rather than abolishing government: "I ask for, not at once no government, but at once a better government."

Thoreau's "Cape Cod" is the next release in the Classic Masterpiece Series by WordsworthGreenwich Press scheduled for mid-December publication.

More about this WordsworthGreenwich Press release of "Walden" and "Civil Disobedience" may be previewed at leading booksellers like Amazon at: http://www.amazon.com/Walden-Disobedience-Henry-David-Thoreau/dp/1456453475/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1417538135&sr=8-1&keywords=walden%2C+lentz%2C+thoreau

 A graduate of Bates College, Lentz is a member of the Academy of American Poets, the Poetry Society of America, Connecticut Authors and Publishers Association, the Center for Fiction in New York and the Royal Society of Literature in London. His books are available online, at fine bookstores, libraries and leading Internet booksellers in 29 nations.

 +      +      +

+        +        +

News Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Love Songs in Sonnets from New England Sing of the Power of Authentic Love

November 3, 2014 Greenwich, CT Greenwich writer, David B. Lentz, has published a new book of sonnets composed as love songs to his wife. He sought in the itinerary of a creative journey to understand what he had learned from epiphanies in everyday life in New England inspired by authentic love.

“I have been blessed over 27 years to love only one woman. I know of no power, which connects human beings more profoundly than authentic love,” Lentz said. “No other power on earth can surpass its pure integrity.”

"Sonnets from New England tacitly acknowledge the enigma and evanescence of life. One hears in these sonnets the sensibility of a contemporary avatar of Wallace Stevens. It is when Lentz describes nature that his lines relax the most, and these tautly structured sonnets expand, as if imbibing the pristine air of the pastoral New England environs the poet describes,” said Eric Sonnenschein, novelist and author of Ad Nomad. “Lentz helps us find true north in ourselves. This is the most important connection art can make."

The origin of the sonnet means "little song" and these sonnets -- accompanied by color photos of Greenwich and Old Greenwich -- sing of a deep, abiding love informed by the amiable landscape of the towns, mountains, coastline and lakes of New England.

“The Irish poet, Derek Mahon, still writes rhyming verse resembling sonnets. And so, too, does the American poet, David B. Lentz... Case in point, the opening quatrain from Ireland... No doubt, Mahon, or even Heaney, would have been pleased to pen those lines," said Gary W. Anderson, novelist and author of Best of All Possible Worlds.

Since its invention by the poet, Petrarch, and refinement by Shakespeare and Edmund Spenser, the 14-line rhyming sonnet was meant to be a love song like a finely cut, crystal goblet to the wine of love. Lentz offers new sonnet forms to refresh its style, which has languished, as contemporary poets express themselves with more open poetic forms.

"Poems of love and passion and the greater forces of divine nature. These are the bread and water of life, are they not? How refreshing to read poetry that shoots straight for the heart," wrote author, Bruce McLaren, on Goodreads.

Also a writer of fiction, drama and nonfiction, Lentz is intrigued by the sonnet because of the challenge of the simplicity, honesty and emotion, which inform this poetic form. The discipline of the different rhyming schemes of the sonnet challenge a poet to express a command of the language so that the lines of the sonnet are genuinely lyrical.

"Lentz’s touching and humble sonnets are love songs – elegant meditations on what true love really is and snapshots of a life two people have built together. There is a disarming passion and candor to these verses, as if one has been welcomed into someone else’s house – and privileged to overhear an intimate conversation," said Terry Richard Bazes, novelist and author of Goldsmith’s Return.

 It is customary for a sonnet to flow in a simple and natural manner but to conclude with a “turn” at which point the sonnet is meant to bring home its meaning. The most compelling sonnets offer their turns in line 14.

“Expressed so clearly, the tender feelings of his sonnets are eternal,” wrote Krishna Bhatt, Author of Royal Enigma.

What did his wife think of his sonnets?

“Thus, the Muse morphs into the literary critic,” Lentz said. “Yes, she loved her sonnets. But I’m taking flak from other men that I’ve raised the bar a bit too high. My response is: write or read a sonnet to someone whom you love. Your significant other will love you all the more for it and raise a cup of wine to your good taste.”

Early reviews of these sonnets appear on Goodreads at: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/23242462-sonnets-from-new-England

 A graduate of Bates College, Lentz is a member of the Academy of American Poets, the Poetry Society of America, Connecticut Authors and Publishers Association, the Center for Fiction in New York and the Royal Society of Literature in London. His books are available online, at fine bookstores, libraries and leading Internet booksellers in 29 nations.

 +      +      +

What People Are Saying

Early Reviews of Sonnets from New England: Love Songs

 "Beneath this feast of vivid impressions and fine details, Sonnets from New England tacitly acknowledges the enigma and evanescence of life. One hears in these sonnets the sensibility of a contemporary avatar of Wallace Stevens. It is when Lentz describes nature that his lines relax the most, and these tautly structured sonnets expand, as if imbibing the pristine air of the pastoral New England environs the poet describes. Ultimately, Sonnets from New England is a stimulating, reflective visit to a poet’s mind. We turn the pages of a life fully embraced, deeply felt, and eloquently expressed. These sonnets speak in vibrant images and eloquent phrases. Poetry has its itinerary. The personal is the surest route to the universal; we explore another soul, and discover our own. By recreating pivotal moments in his life and articulating values that sustain him, David Lentz helps us find true north in ourselves. This is the most important connection art can make." Eric Sonnenschein, Novelist, Author of Ad Nomad 

"One often finds that works in received forms feel like something of a literary exercise, where excellence is gauged by one’s implicit and explicit control of the medium. Of course, there are exceptions to this: the Bard, for one. And Keats. And in more modern times, Hopkins and most notably, Rilke. The Irish poet Derek Mahon still writes rhyming verse resembling sonnets. And so, too, does the American poet David B. Lentz... Case in point, the opening quatrain from Ireland... No doubt, Mahon, or even Heaney, would have been pleased to pen those lines." Gary W. Anderson, Author of Best of All Possible Worlds

"Lentz’s touching and humble sonnets are love songs – elegant meditations on what true love really is and snapshots of a life two people have built together. There is a disarming passion and candor to these verses, as if one has been welcomed into someone else’s house – and privileged to overhear an intimate conversation."Terry Richard Bazes, Novelist, Author of Goldsmith’s Return

“Expressed so clearly, the tender feelings of his sonnets are eternal. Love is the only bliss which never gets old.” Krishna Bhatt, Author of The Royal Enigma

"Beautiful, delightful, meaningful and more importantly bare truth expressed in writing with style." Goodreads

"Poems of love and passion and the greater forces of divine nature. These are the bread and water of life, are they not? How refreshing to read poetry that shoots straight for the heart. Lentz is a champion of love who has the courage to stare fate in the face... He writes what he wants, how he wants, and he writes what he likes to write about. In this case, it is love. This is a great collection of works about the one subject that really matters in life, and is a tribute to the woman he loves the most. I applaud Lentz for his creative output in this most noble of endeavors." Bruce McLaren, Author of The Plain of Dead Cities

"A world of lovers pulsing, breathing, absorbing, secreting so passionately even angels are envious." John H. Sibley, Author of Being and Homelessness: Notes from an Underground Artist 

“After reading a few lines of Sonnets you will experience deep and genuine love. His poetry is meant to be read aloud, savored and reread.” Virginia Marciano

“I was so enraptured by the life of the words that he chose and awed by the love emanating from them that I was overcome by their beauty. This is an unparalleled energy and love that captures the blessings in all of life. Few arrive on this earth with such gifts. David Lentz’ passion for life and love for all of creation is evident throughout the Sonnets. Timeless.”Roxana Bowgen, Author of Agapanthus Rising

"Love this writer! Old Greenwich Odes introduced me to David Lentz's writings. Sonnets from New England: Love Songs is wonderful and will be shared with family and friends."Caroline Gerardo, Poet and Novelist, Author of Toxic Assets

“A charming bouquet of sonnets and loving testimonial to the poet's wife. The collection is also a sampler of various sonnet forms, including one of Lentz's own invention. The only classic styles I failed to find were a curtal (or shortened) and a caudate (with a "tail")... The use of a seven-beat line blends the beat of the classic ballad to the rhythms of the sonnet: a nice innovation. Recommended for the eternal romantic in everyone's heart."Christopher Bernard, Poet, Author of In the American Night

    +        +        +